Tag Archives: Tribe

Appledore book festival

I am very pleased with the wonderful piece of artwork handed to me yesterday at the Appledore Book Festival. Charlie, from the local primary school, had not only read one of my books but had been inspired to draw her favourite character – Bee. The picture is going up on the wall of my study.

It was lovely to be invited to be part of Appledore’s literary fest, and interesting to visit for the second time, the first being over forty years ago. All I can remember from the childhood trip was losing my crab line to an ocean liner. I’ll remember a lot more about my author visit, mainly the laughing, the boy who uncannily answered all the questions about my past correctly, the poor librarian with no voice, the penultimate scene in the story Years 4 and 5 made up with me in which Matthew and Ella (our characters) shared a spot of cooking with the rats in the sewer and came up with a delicious chocolate cake! Not what I would have thought of but that’s the joy of it all.

The afternoon was finished off with tea from a pot in a china cup at Polly’s house which has an amazing front door with five keyholes to mark all the locks from all the years. Polly is the school’s organiser who put me on the list of authors, so thank you, Polly.

Off to Hillcrest School today to be entertained (I hope) by Year 6. Hotwells Primary tomorrow. Wonder whether anyone will have anything Tribish for me . . . a sculpture of Copper Pie made from beef crisp packets, a charcoal of Fifty, from the embers of all the fires he’s started . . .

how did we end up singing monkey songs?

I’m really not sure how it came about. We were having a nice afternoon, quite noisy but productive, and suddenly we found ourselves in a situation with some angry monkeys, that is, our characters did.  The children from Years 5 and 6 at Sidcot had created bit-dipsy Cissy the Singer and clumsy-footballer Taylor but through some unfortunate events the protagonists ended up in a rainforest surrounded by a monkey mob. There was obviously only one thing for it, Cissy had to sing them to sleep. Now when we’re making up stories in my workshops I do like to take advantage of all opportunities so surely we needed someone to sing. I had a go. Poor. So I looked to the audience. Luckily there is no lack of confidence amongst the children of Sidcot. By the time we’d wrapped up the story three children had joined me at the front to attempt a version of the putting-angry-monkeys-to-sleep song. Here is the first to take up the challenge:-

She did a grand job. As did the other monkey warblers. It took some determination to get back on track after the singing, but I read an excerpt of Monkey Bars and Rubber Ducks and thankfully all was calm again. After a Q&A where we debated the use of ‘said’ as opposed to ‘remarked’ or ‘exclaimed’ there was book signing, and as can be seen from the pic, the book I’d read from was the most popular choice.